Author: Suzanne James

Review: Cabaret At the Kravis Center, West Palm Beach

The Cabaret performance at the Kravis Center was an exercises in multiple meta-cliches and theatrical adulteration. Cabaret has a long and circuitous lineage, dating back to the early twentieth century. The production staged at the Kravis Center recently is part of a national tour and utilizes many of the tropes from the original 1966 Broadway production which won eight Tony Awards. The 1972 Bob Fosse film won eight Academy Awards, including Best Actress for Liza Minnelli and etched itself into the popular American consciousness as it solidified Ms. Minelli’s theatrical and film legacy as one of the great American...

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Review: Florida Grand Opera’s Salome at the Arsht Center, Miami

Richard Strauss wrote and produced Salome in 1905 when the world was on the brink of war and the musical cosmos was about to be blown to smithereens by the likes of Rachmaninoff, Schoenberg, American Blues, Elvis, Chuck Berry, Hendrix, and on and on. Salome is the story of King Herod and John the Baptist. It is the story of a New Testament episode central to the link between the Judeo-Christian Old Testament and the future of Christianity. A tale of lust, envy, evil and tragedy, Salome was crafted to great dramatic effect by the Florida Grand Opera in...

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Wall Street Philanthropist Bill Miller Donates $75 Million to Johns Hopkins University Philosophy Department

Who says Philosophy is boring? Wall Street Investor Bill Miller, the man who famously  beat the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index for 15 consecutive years announced a gift of $75 million to the philosophy department of Johns Hopkins University.  The donation was formally announced on Tuesday and is the largest gift to a philosophy department anywhere in the world, ever! The funds will rename the Johns Hopkins Philosophy department after its benefactor and allow for a doubling of full time faculty to twenty two professors. The gift will also support graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and create new courses whose goal...

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Review: The Little Foxes at Palm Beach Dramaworks

The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman is a work of theater with a long and sumptuous history. The 1939 play whose title comes from Chapter 2, Verse 15 of the Song of Solomon (“Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines: for our vines have tender grapes.) originally starred Tallulah Bankhead in the first production staged in New York. It was made into a 1941 film starring Bette Davis. In 1949 the play was also adapted into an opera titled “Regina” by Mark Blitztein. There was also a television mini-series in the 1950s and numerous re-stagings hence....

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Review: Ing an Die at the Carnival Studio Theater, Miami

Contemporary dance performances are perhaps the most unpredictable events of all the performing arts. One never knows what to expect from the performers and choreographers, other than supremely toned bodies exhibited in costumes and clothing that push the boundaries of modesty and exhibitionism equally. In fact, it appears to this reviewer that the fashions of dancers would make for a great blog, book or paper topic for those, like me, who are intrigued by the nature of clothing and it’s contextually-specific relationships to the human body. In James McGinn‘s Ing an Die, performed recently at the Arsht Center’s Carnival...

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